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Mystery Bird of April 2013

Mystery Bird of April 2013

Mystery Bird of April 2013 – Pinterest/via Lara Probert

Are these two males fighting, or the mating ritual of male/female identical birds???

OK, someone, tell us who they are…

There are so many excellent photos of UNIDENTIFIED beautiful birds available on the Internet. This is the next in a series of Monthly Mystery Birds from around the world. This series seeks to tap the knowledge of people who recognize these beauties, and to spread that knowledge to the rest of us. There’s something satisfying about knowing the names of birds. They become more familiar to us and seem more like friends when we know what to call them. Sort of like, “Oh, there’s Brad Pitt”, rather than, “Oh, there’s some guy on the street.”

After some expert supplies the name of our Mystery Bird, we’ll add some details about just who that bird is and where it’s from.

If you recognize this bird, please respond in the Comments Section below, and help to enlighten our readers.

If you have any views on this, or experiences of your own you’d like to share, We’d love to hear from you – please leave a comment below.

Jack
TheNatureOfHiking.com
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Posted by on May 14, 2013 in Mystery Birds

 

The Brazen Blue Jay

The Brazen Blue Jay

Blue Jay in snow - ecotime.blogspot.com

Blue Jay in snow – ecotime.blogspot.com

Yes, they’re beautiful, bountiful, brazen, and bold. Marked by flagrant and insolent audacity, this large songbird of eastern and central North America is well known for its behavior and loud calls. I have several times seen Blue Jays repeatedly swoop down to attack cats and drive them away. Cats are FAST, but the jays skillfully avoid the flashing claws and quickly frustrate the cat who usually retires with a frown on its face. You know that disgusted look that cats can get. It’s all very amusing to human onlookers.

Blue Jay - cs.birdwatchingdaily.com

Blue Jay – cs.birdwatchingdaily.com

Blue Jays are also known for their intelligence and complex social systems with tight family bonds. Their fondness for acorns is credited with helping spread oak trees after the last glacial period.

They have a prominent perky crest with bright blue, white, and black plumage; The tail is broad and rounded. Blue Jays are smaller than crows, but larger than robins.

Songs

The Blue Jay vocalization most often considered a song is the “whisper song,” a soft, quiet conglomeration of clicks, chucks, whirrs, whines, liquid notes, and elements of other calls; a singing bout may last longer than 2 minutes.

Blue Jay Family - birddirectory.blogspot.com

Blue Jay Family – birddirectory.blogspot.com

Calls

Blue Jays make a large variety of calls that carry long distances, and are most often detected by these noisy calls. Most calls are produced while the jay is perched in a tree. Usually they fly across open areas silently, especially during migration. The most often heard is a loud jeer, Blue Jays also make clear whistled notes and gurgling sounds. They frequently mimic hawks, especially Red-shouldered Hawks.

Where to See Them

They are common and prefer wooded areas, often in small noisy groups. Near shorelines they migrate in loose flocks; you can recognize them by their steady flight, rounded wings, long tail, and white underside. Resident birds may associate in flocks; they usually fly across open areas one at a time, often silently. Also watch for them at feeders.

Blue Jays prefer tray feeders or hopper feeders on a post rather than hanging feeders, and they prefer peanuts, sunflower seeds, and suet. Planting oak trees will make acorns available for jays of the future. Blue Jays often take drinks from birdbaths. They will often stuff food items in a throat pouch to cache elsewhere. When eating, they hold a seed or nut in feet and peck it open.

Baby Blue Jay - paulduann.com

Baby Blue Jay – paulduann.com

If you have any views on this, or experiences of your own you’d like to share,
We’d love to hear from you – please leave a comment below.

Jack
TheNatureOfHiking.com
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Posted by on May 14, 2013 in Beautiful Birds

 

Red and Yellow Barbet

Red and Yellow Barbet - Pinterest via Lara Probert

Red and Yellow Barbet – Pinterest via Lara Probert

The Red and Yellow Barbet (Trachyphonus erythrocephalus) is a species of African barbet found in eastern Africa. Males have distinctive black (spotted white), red, and yellow plumage; females and juveniles are similar, but less brightly colored. The species lives in broken terrain and nests and roosts in burrows. Omnivorous, the species feeds on seeds, fruit, and invertebrates. Where not hunted, they are tame, but their feathers are used by certain tribes, such as the Maasai.

The female is similar to the male, but is, overall, much duller, with less red and orange, and more yellow and white. Specifically, females lack the throat patch, and typically lack the crown. Young birds are also duller- they typically have less red and orange, as with the female. The spots on the back are less white, and all blacks are more brown. The eyes are typically grey.

Red and Yellow Barbet by Rob Bobert

Red and Yellow Barbet by Rob Bobert

 

The species avoid both very open areas and areas of dense woodland, instead preferring broken terrain such as riverbeds and cliffs or termite mounds. It nests and roosts in tunnels, and forages on or close to the ground. Red-and-yellow Barbets are omnivores, feeding on seeds, fruit, and invertebrates.

Red and Yellow Barbet - wild4photographicsafaris.blogspot.com

Red and Yellow Barbet – wild4photographicsafaris.blogspot.com

 

 

They are found from central Kenya to north-east Tanzania. Trachyphonus erythrocephalus versicolor is found in south-east Sudan, north-east Uganda, south-west Ethiopia and north Kenya. Trachyphonus erythrocephalus shelleyi is found in Somalia and eastern Ethiopia.
If you have any views on this, or experiences of your own you’d like to share,
We’d love to hear from you – please leave a comment below.

Jack
TheNatureOfHiking.com
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Posted by on April 21, 2013 in Beautiful Birds

 

Mystery Bird of March 2013

Mystery Bird of March 2013 - Pinterest/via Lara Probert

Mystery Bird of March 2013 – Pinterest/via Lara Probert

OK, someone, tell us who he is…

There are so many excellent photos of UNIDENTIFIED beautiful birds available on the Internet. This is the next in a series of Monthly Mystery Birds from around the world. This series seeks to tap the knowledge of people who recognize these beauties, and to spread that knowledge to the rest of us. There’s something satisfying about knowing the names of birds. They become more familiar to us and seem more like friends when we know what to call them. Sort of like, “Oh, there’s Brad Pitt”, rather than, “Oh, there’s some guy on the street.”

After some expert supplies the name of our Mystery Bird, we’ll add some details about just who that bird is and where it’s from.

If you recognize this bird, please respond in the Comments Section below, and help to enlighten our readers.

If you have any views on this, or experiences of your own you’d like to share, We’d love to hear from you – please leave a comment below.

Jack
TheNatureOfHiking.com
Find us on , Facebook, and Twitter

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 21, 2013 in Mystery Birds

 

Mystery Bird of February 2013

Mystery Bird of February 2013 - Pinterest/via Lara Probert

Mystery Bird of February 2013 – Pinterest/via Lara Probert

Just look at those tail feathers – COOL!!!

OK, someone, tell us who he is…

There are so many excellent photos of UNIDENTIFIED beautiful birds available on the Internet. This is the next in a series of Monthly Mystery Birds from around the world. This series seeks to tap the knowledge of people who recognize these beauties, and to spread that knowledge to the rest of us. There’s something satisfying about knowing the names of birds. They become more familiar to us and seem more like friends when we know what to call them. Sort of like, “Oh, there’s Brad Pitt”, rather than, “Oh, there’s some guy on the street.”

After some expert supplies the name of our Mystery Bird, we’ll add some details about just who that bird is and where it’s from.

If you recognize this bird, please respond in the Comments Section below, and help to enlighten our readers.

If you have any views on this, or experiences of your own you’d like to share, We’d love to hear from you – please leave a comment below.

Jack

TheNatureOfHiking.com
Find us on , Facebook, and Twitter

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 21, 2013 in Mystery Birds

 

Mystery Bird of January 2013

Mystery Bird of January 2013 - Pinterest/via via Wilbur Hot Springs

Mystery Bird of January 2013 – Pinterest/via via Wilbur Hot Springs

Spectacular colors and beautiful white crown. Some kind of heron?

OK, someone, tell us who he is…

There are so many excellent photos of UNIDENTIFIED beautiful birds available on the Internet. This is the next in a series of Monthly Mystery Birds from around the world. This series seeks to tap the knowledge of people who recognize these beauties, and to spread that knowledge to the rest of us. There’s something satisfying about knowing the names of birds. They become more familiar to us and seem more like friends when we know what to call them. Sort of like, “Oh, there’s Brad Pitt”, rather than, “Oh, there’s some guy on the street.”

After some expert supplies the name of our Mystery Bird, we’ll add some details about just who that bird is and where it’s from.

If you recognize this bird, please respond in the Comments Section below, and help to enlighten our readers.

If you have any views on this, or experiences of your own you’d like to share, We’d love to hear from you – please leave a comment below.

Jack
TheNatureOfHiking.com
Find us on , Facebook, and Twitter

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 27, 2013 in Mystery Birds

 

Mystery Bird of November – SOLVED

Mystery Bird of November

Mystery Bird of November – by Sergiu Bacioiu on Flickr

What amazing color! Looks like a band on the right leg, so someone must be able to identify this beauty. Great photography Sergiu.

OK, someone, tell us who he is…

And again, many thanks to Jay at naturalistsangle.blogspot.com for identifying this beautiful mystery bird as the Brazilian Tanager (Ramphocelus bresilius) from, you guessed it, Brazil, occurring in the coastal region from Paraíba and southwards to Santa Catarina.  Jay has turned out to be our long-sought expert in identifying many mystery birds from around the world. Great work, Jay.

Brazilian Tanager - farm4.staticflickr.com

Brazilian Tanager – farm4.staticflickr.com

This Tanager behaves aggressively towards other species of birds when disputing for food. Its native habitat is coastal “restingas” — forests which form on sand, acidic, and nutrient-poor soils — but they can sometimes be seen in cities with large, well-wooded parks.They are normally found near water, either the ocean or a river.

The male’s plumage is bright red with black wings and tail feathers. They also have a white spot at the base of their short, strong beak. They acquire this attractive plumage in their second year. The female is slightly duller. Brazilian Tanagers are frugivores, meaning their diet consists exclusively of fruits.

They build a cup shaped nest on branches or hidden amongst foliage in trees. The entrance is usually on the side of the nest. The clutch size is 3-5 greenish-blue, black-spotted eggs which the female incubates alone for 13 days. The chicks fledge 14-17 after hatching but only become fully independent some 3 weeks later. Each pair produces 2-3 clutches per season.

If you have any views on this, or experiences of your own you’d like to share, We’d love to hear from you – please leave a comment below.

Jack
TheNatureOfHiking.com
Find us on , Facebook, and Twitter

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 27, 2013 in Mystery Birds